Applying for Citizenship

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Our office has an immigration attorney who has a great deal of experience in helping clients apply for citizenship. This is something that many permanent residents do not apply for because of many different reasons. The immigration attorney strongly encourages permanent residents to apply for citizenship if they are eligible. If a permanent resident received permanent residence through marriage and has been married to the same person for three years, they are eligible to apply for citizenship after three years. People who received permanent residence through other methods are eligible to apply for citizenship after five years. You have to be at least eighteen years old in order to apply for citizenship. Normally people who apply for citizenship have to pass English and civics testing requirements. There are different testing requirements based on the age and length of permanent residence of the applicant at the time of application. If someone is over 50 years of age and has lived in the U.S. as a lawful permanent resident for at least 20 years, or if someone is 55 years of age and has lived in the U.S. as a lawful permanent resident for at lest 15 years, that person does not have to take the English test but may take the civics test in the language of their choice. Someone who is over 65 years of age and has lived in the U.S. as a lawful permanent resident for at least 20 years does not have to take the English test but has to take a simpler version of the civics test in the language of their choice. Someone who is a lawful permanent resident can always be removed should they commit some offense that makes them removable. Citizens of the U.S. are not subject to removal from the U.S. Call our office at 214-357-1782 and we can help you apply for citizenship. Our e-mail address is info@themorrisfirm.net.

MANDATORY DETENTION BY DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY

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Once detained by the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) some individuals are not eligible to be bonded out.  These are individuals that have Mandatory Detention.  Mandatory Detention includes the following:

  • Arriving aliens;
  • Individuals subject to expedited removal who claim a credible fear of persecution in their native country;
  • Criminal aliens listed in Section 212(a)(2)of the Act;
  • Criminal aliens who are deportable or removable based upon convictions found under INA § 237(a)(2); and
  • Terrorists under INA 237(a)(3)-(4).

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The Attorney General may release an individual subject to Mandatory Detention if it is deemed necessary.  DHS may release certain conditions if there is clear and convincing evidence that the release does not pose a danger to the community and evidence that the alien will appear for later proceedings.

There is action attempting to prevent long term detention of individuals stemming from cases such as Preap et al v. Beers et al.  If a person close to you is detained, consult with legal counsel asap to discover their rights.

Daniel L Morris, The Morris Law Firm, (214)357-1782 info@themorrisfirm.net